I Hate Your Feedback But I Will Consider It

 In Confidence, Leadership

In 2015 the NY Times did a piece about corporate giant Amazon.com  and many of their controversial workplace tactics employed by upper management. The company drew fire on several management habits, but topping the list was the near-constant feedback co-workers received from their bosses and peers about nearly everything. This excessive feedback was often secret (your co-worker might send a text about you to your boss at midnight) and brutal, according to Amazon employees.

Whether you work at Amazon or elsewhere, you undoubtedly get feedback. Anyone who has achieved a desirable level of success has done so in part because they got some direct, perhaps even tough, feedback, found it useful and changed something. But how do we discern which feedback is useful? And more importantly, how do we deal with feedback when it hurts or when it feels inaccurate or when there is absolutely nothing we can do about it? I have created a quick process that will help you flush out the feedback and help you decide if it is useful or not. I use when I myself and I hope you find it helpful for feedback you have received recently or perhaps some from long ago that still bothers you.

 

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